• Ella Wood

Caitlin Winter: Marketing Manager

We caught up with Caitlin to find out more about her story.


Why did you choose to get into marketing and how did you get started?

Unlike my older sister, who knew she wanted to be a lawyer from a young age, I struggled for a long time with what I would do for a living. As a child I loved making up stories and frequently heard my parents sigh; “if only you remembered your times tables as well as you do the TV jingles.” Looking back on it, a career in Marketing seems like an obvious path.


Still a little confused after graduating high school, I decided to embark on a Bachelor of Commerce. During my first year I quickly learnt that Accounting and Finance weren’t my jam, but Marketing was where my interest piqued. It was during my time at Uni, when I was interning at a digital agency, that realised this was something I not only enjoyed, but was good at. Something about helping businesses reach audiences in new and exciting ways, coupled with helping consumers discover new products and services just spoke to me. And the rest, as they say, is history.



What challenges have you faced during your career?

Attempting to convince or explain your work and worth to people in a company who don’t fully understand the complexities of your role has always been a challenge for me.


As I’m sure many people in creative industries understand, it is usually our roles that get scaled back or cut when times are hard. It makes things even harder when upper management just think you play around on Facebook all day when you’re working on developing the relationship between the company and the rest of the world.


Do you think it's important for women to be visible in upper management in communications, why?

Absolutely, having more balance in upper management roles can only be beneficial for creative industries. For younger women starting out in creative industries it’s important to see their future selves represented in upper management.


Do you think there is enough support for women in our industry here in Adelaide, what would you like to see more or less of?

Unfortunately, Adelaide has always had a bit of a problem with Tall Poppy Syndrome. There is definitely a need and space for a place where women can support each other and work collaboratively instead of all fighting for the same slice of pie. My opinion is, the more we all get to know each other, and work together, the more interesting, diverse and successful our industry will be.


Mentorship is something else I would love to see more of in our industry. Having someone who is in your field who you can look up to, ask questions and learn from is indispensable. I’ve been lucky enough to have some amazing women help me along the way and I truly wish that for everyone else – no matter what stage of their career.


What advice would you give someone starting out now?

Gain as much experience as you can. Apply for that internship, do that online course, register for those webinars and read as many articles as possible. Most of our creative industries are every-changing, so if you keep learning, you’ll always produce relevant and exciting work.


How do you see the industry progressing over the next 5-10 years, what do you hope for?

With the rate that technology is gifting us all of these new platforms, I expect the industry to only get weirder and more wonderful with more opportunities for us to get creative. My hope is that the amazing women kicking ass in the creative industries get the recognition they deserve and continue to inspire us all to keep creating magic.


Instagram: @askmyfriendjane

Whether you are a member of this community or an advocate, your involvement ensures we can continue to support and represent women in the Creative Communication industry.

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